CALM ME Program Resources

/CALM ME Program Resources
CALM ME Program Resources2018-11-19T17:46:23+00:00

Welcome to CALM Me Program – Resources

“Calm Me.” will educate on stress drivers and assist members with techniques and tools to lower stress levels for improved health. We have provided parts of the entire programs in each tab below. Each week we will email or text you to focus on a particular section of the program. 

Do you have feedback or suggestions for the CALM ME program? Take the survey now and let us know your thoughts, plus you get to secure 25 points for this challenge.

Know Me. Calm Me.

Education and Encouragement for a Healthier, Happier Life.

Subject:  Good and Bad Stress – Knowing the Difference for a Calmer You.

While the word “stress” may come with a negative connotation, some stress is considered “Good” and vital to your survival.  A few of the positive benefits of stress, which is also referred to as a “burst” of energy or “Eustress” include:

  1. Improvement in how your heart works and protecting your body from infection;
  2. Helping you to meet daily challenges and motivation;
  3. Improving memory; and
  4. Initiating a vital warning system to help you stay safe.

However, too much stress over long periods of time is “Bad” stress, or “Distress/Chronic Stress”,  and can be detrimental to your health and weaken your immune system.  A few impacts may include:

  1. High Blood Pressure
  2. Fatigue
  3. Depression
  4. Heart disease

 To understand the type of stress you are experiencing, listen to your body and know the signs which could include:

  1. An inability to concentrate
  2. Catching colds more frequently
  3. Experiencing abnormal body aches and headaches

As the holidays near, it is important to keep everything in perspective and lessen the impacts of the increased stressors that may coincide with “holiday hustle and bustle”.  If you feel that you are unable to manage your stress, schedule an appointment with your doctor or a specialist to help identify strategies that will help.

Download the stress flyer now to learn more about the types of stress, the impacts and warning signs in order to help you take the best steps in managing and preserving your health and wellness.

Try the Breathing Meditation

New Me. Know Me. Calm Me.

Education and Encouragement for a Healthier, Happier Life.

Subject: 3 Steps to Reducing Stress and Be a Calmer You

The key to managing and reducing stress is knowing the signs, understanding the triggers, identifying techniques to lessen the impacts and managing it more effectively.  There has been a lot of research that directly links stress to weakening your immune system and heart, as well as negatively affecting your brain and neurological system.

The effects of too much stress affect everyone differently and may be more physical, emotional, mental and/or behavioral.  Download the stress symptoms flyer and take the steps to reduce the stress with these simple steps.

  1. Exercise Daily for at Least 30 Minutes –  This will help flood your body with feel-good endorphins, improve your mood, boost your energy and help to give you a healthy distraction. Not only will this help in the short term, exercising is also known to reduce your susceptibility to longer-term stress.
  2. Modify your Diet – Certain foods, like warm oatmeal, can actually help calm your brain by boosting levels of serotonin. Complex carbs include whole-grain bread, pasta, and breakfast cereals.  Other foods such as oranges, spinach, and salmon, can cut levels of cortisol and adrenaline which can take a negative toll on your body over time.
  3. Get Enough SleepSleep deprivation not only affects your mood, concentration, memory, and weight – it can also increase your risk of developing diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease.  Adding this on top of the effects of stress makes you even more susceptible to health issues.

Download the 10 things you can do to manage stress flyer now to unlock more ways to help reduce additional stress this holiday season for a healthier, calmer you.  As a reminder, If you feel that you are unable to manage your stress, schedule an appointment with your doctor or a specialist to help identify strategies that will help.

Podcast

Understanding Stress . . . provides an overview of stress, what it is caused by and helpful tips to reduce and manage stress.

Click here to listen to podcast on Anchor

Know Me. Calm Me.

Education and Encouragement for a Healthier, Happier Life.

Subject: Knowing and Managing Stressors in 5 Steps this Holiday Season

We all know that there are many different types of “stressors” in everyday life when demands exceed your ability to cope.  While sometimes beneficial and motivating by the “burst” of energy it may create, too much stress has a negative impact on your health – from your immune system to your nervous system and ultimately your emotional state of mind.

These stressors may be the direct result of dissatisfaction with your job, concerns about finances, relationship issues or substance abuse.  While the list is long, and exacerbated with the holidays looming, managing them can be narrowed down to 5 healthy and proven techniques and one simple quote.

  1. Take a Break From the Stressor. While it may seem impossible or too difficult to walk away, letting yourself do so and refocusing on something else, will help you to “refresh” and feel less overwhelmed.  You are not avoiding it, you are just giving yourself permission to step away and gain a different perspective.
  2. Get up and Exercise.  Research proves that the benefits to your mind and body from just a quick 30-minute walk, run, swim or bike ride will help you to regroup and minimize the stressors in your day.
  3. Relieve the Tension with a Smile. Stress shows through facial expressions – try finding something that relieves that tension, makes you smile and potentially laugh.  They do say that “laughter will always be the best medicine”.
  4. Reach out for Support. If you feel overwhelmed, talking through it will help alleviate the added pressure and validate your feelings.  Call a friend, family member or a colleague you trust.
  5. Meditation & Mindfulness.  There are many types of meditation including Yoga, Acupuncture, and Visualization.  They can be short breathing and stretching techniques to help release emotions that may be causing physical stress or they may be more focused on clearing the mind and refocusing on the positives and not the negatives.  Taking a few minutes will allow you to reset and re-energize your mind and body.

Rule number one is, don’t sweat the small stuff.

Rule number two is, it’s all small stuff.”

—Robert Eliot

Download the holiday stress management flyer now to put things in perspective this holiday season and not let the added “hustle and bustle” impact your health and wellbeing. Always remember that If you feel that you are unable to manage your stress, schedule an appointment with your doctor or a specialist to help identify strategies that will help.

Subject: Signs to Look for in Identifying Depression and Anxiety

 There is a direct link of chronic stress with diagnoses of anxiety and depression.  Stressors such as divorce, financial concerns, loss of a loved one, dissatisfaction with work are a few that may be experienced daily, but with the holidays in full swing, the impact can result in more serious illnesses, most commonly, clinical depression and/or anxiety.

According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, 322 million people worldwide live with depression and 264 million people worldwide have an anxiety disorder.  One-half of those diagnosed with depression are also diagnosed with an anxiety disorder.

Some signs of a major depressive disorder may include:

  • Persistent sadness, anxiousness or emptiness
  • Feelings of hopelessness, pessimism
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, helplessness
  • Excessive fatigue and insomnia
  • Loss of appetite, restlessness, and irritability

Some signs of general anxiety disorders may include:  

  • Constant feeling of restlessness, being on the edge
  • Difficulty controlling excessive worrying and concentrating
  • Increased irritability, and sleeping disorders
  • Excessive muscle tension and physical fatigue
  • Chronic indigestion
  • Panic attacks and phobias

 

Both depression and anxiety are serious illnesses that should NOT be taken lightly. Knowing the signs and symptoms are important to recognizing, diagnosing and getting the right treatment.  Download the flyer now.

Most importantly, remember, you are not alone and help is available – reach out and contact your doctor immediately if you feel it is unmanageable.  Numerous hotlines are available and can be found here. 

Subject: Five Tips to Managing Depression and Anxiety

As the holidays are in full swing, the added stress and pressures are mounting and unfortunately, for many people, it is a time that increases the feelings of loneliness, focus on past failures, and increases the anxiety about an unknown or uncertain future.

What’s labeled as the “holiday blues” are exacerbated by the additional demands of finances, shopping, parties and gatherings, and extended visits by family and friends.

Below are 5 tips to help you get through and enjoy the season: 

  1. Set realistic goals, pace yourself and organize your time. Know what you can and cannot do and remember that your commitment and activities can be spread out.
    2. Acknowledge your feelings are normal. Always remember that the holiday season does not relinquish the feelings of sadness or loneliness.  There is room for them in the holidays, recognizing them will help you manage them more effectively.
  2. Try not to compare previous years to the present. Every season is different and will provide an opportunity for enjoyment in its own way.
    4. Do something for someone else. Try volunteering your time to make a difference in someone else’s life. You will be amazed at how fulfilling that can feel.
    5. Try activities that are free to alleviate the perceived “financial” strain. Take a tour around town to look at holiday decorations, go window shopping or just go on a hike and enjoy nature.

Download the flyer now to find more helpful tips for managing stress, anxiety, and depression this holiday season.

It  is important to reach out for help immediately if the symptoms are unbearable and/or if you are having thoughts of suicide.  There are numerous hotlines available and can be found here. 

Do you have feedback or suggestions for the CALM ME program? Take the survey now and let us know your thoughts, plus you get to secure 25 points for this challenge.

Subject: A toolkit to help encourage a calmer and healthier you

Build your own toolkit and take control of your health and happiness.  Throughout the course of this challenge, we have provided you with information on the what, the why, and some helpful tips for managing stress, anxiety, and depression.  Now it is up to you to find what works best for you.

Below are few of the recommended tools to help customize a toolkit that fits your life and your needs.  There is no right or wrong, or certain number you should choose.

  • Keep a journal or diary.

Maintain a record of those stressful moments in a small notebook somewhere private (a purse, locked drawer) and when you get flustered, take it out and record the date/time, description, the effect on your mood, a scale of the level of stress and the first signal that you experienced.

  • Find a hobby that makes you happy.

Fend off stress doing something you enjoy.  This could include photography, knitting, reading, woodwork,  crossword puzzles, and sudoku — all of which are great ways of re-focusing your energy on something that helps you relax.

  • Listen to your favorite music.

Choose pieces that don’t exaggerate feelings of anger, anxiety or sadness. Keep them close by so that you can easily turn it on at the moment that you need to disconnect.

  • Get physical and keep your running shoes close.

It has been proven that physical activity is a great way to reduce stress.  Take 30 minutes to go for a short walk or jog to cool down your over-stimulated mind.

  • Try relaxing techniques such as breathing exercises, yoga or meditation.

Techniques that encourage low, deep breathing and concentration are fundamental. If you’re nervous, anxious or experiencing heightened panic attacks, these activities can help settle your mind, decrease your blood pressure, and slow your heart rate.

  • Make it yours and make it personal.

Whatever you choose,  think about what works for you. If you’re not quite sure, keep an open mind to trying something different.  Avoid unhealthy behaviors such as drinking a lot of coffee, smoking, and eating junk food – these may escalate stress and related problems.

Download the flyer here – Start building a toolkit that works for you!

ALWAYS REMEMBER – if the symptoms are unbearable and/or if you are having thoughts of suicide- reach out immediately to a doctor or contact a hotline which can be found hereThere is help available and it is important to know that you are not alone.

Do you have feedback or suggestions for the CALM ME program? Take the survey now and let us know your thoughts, plus you get to secure 25 points for this challenge.

Holistic Activities to Practice

 

 

 

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