Before & After

/Before & After
Before & After 2017-06-16T15:47:16+00:00

Building Resilience?

Resilience is an “inner strength” that helps you bounce back after stressful situations. When you are resilient, you may recover more quickly from setbacks or difficult changes, including illness.

Developing resilience begins with simple actions or thoughts that you practice, such as planning for what you’ll do next and learning to accept change.

Here are some tips to get started:

  • Change how you think
  • Accept that things change. Look at change as a challenge rather than a threat.
  • Examine how and why you feel the way you do when things change.
  • Expect things to work out. You can’t change what happens, but you can change how you feel about it.
  • See the big picture. Find the positive in stressful situations and learn from the situation.
  • Look for things to learn. Difficult or emotional situations can teach you about yourself. Look to the future, and ask yourself how the stressful event might help you.
  • See the funny side of bad situations.
  • Change how you act,
  • Seek out interactions with people who make you feel better. Build relationships that are solid and loving with your family and others. Help them, and don’t be afraid to let them help you.
  • Develop a support network.

Experts recommend at least 2½ hours of moderate activity (such as brisk walking, brisk cycling, or yard work) a week. It’s fine to walk in blocks of 10 minutes or more throughout your day and week.

Key Points

  • If you’re worried about how brisk walking might affect your health, talk with your doctor before you start a walking program.
  • Start with a short-term goal. For example, walk for 5 or 10 minutes every day. Or increase your number of steps by 300 to 500 each day.
  • After you’ve made walking a habit, set a longer-term goal. You may want to set a goal of walking briskly for at least 30 minutes a day or work up to 10,000 steps a day. You can try to do this 5 days a week or more.
  • You can wear a pedometer to track your steps each day.
  • To stay motivated, find a walking partner, such as a family member, friend, or coworker. Daily dog walks are also a great way to keep up your walking routine